University of North Florida
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Stuart Chalk, Ph.D.
Department of Chemistry
University of North Florida
Phone: 1-904-620-1938
Fax: 1-904-620-3535
Email: schalk@unf.edu
Website: @unf

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Adipose

Classification: Biological tissue -> adipose

Citations 2

"Determination Of Iron And Zinc In Adipose Tissue By Online Microwave-assisted Mineralization And Flow Injection Graphite-furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry"
Anal. Chim. Acta 1995 Volume 308, Issue 1-3 Pages 349-356
J. L. Burguera, M. Burguera, P. Carrero, C. Rivas, M. Gallignani and M. R. Brunetto

Abstract: An automated procedure for the determination of Fe and Zn in adipose tissue by GFAAS was developed incorporating online microwave-assisted mineralization. A mineralization tube was filled with H2SO4/HNO3 (4:1) of acidity 1-2 M and a ~e;20 mg portion of lyophilized tissue was added. The tube was exposed to microwave radiation (40 W) for 10 x 1 s periods with alternating 5 s rest periods. After mineralization, the acid solution was propelled at 2 ml/min to a PTFE collector tube and mixed with Triton X-100 solution to give a final concentration of 0.02% and Pd/Mg matrix modifier. Portions of this mixture were deposited on the graphite platform of the AAS. Fe and Zn were determined at 248.3 and 213.9 nm, respectively, with pyrolysis/atomization temperatures of 1000/2800°C for Fe and 700/2700°C for Zn. The linear range was 5-50 µg/l for Fe and 5-20 µg/l for Zn and the detection limits were 20 and 30 pg, respectively. The results were confirmed by flame AAS following liquid-liquid extraction of the metal chelate.
Iron Zinc Spectrophotometry Sample preparation Microwave Method comparison Online digestion Triton X Surfactant

"Simple Automated System For Continuous-flow Determination Of Glycerol"
Clin. Chem. 1981 Volume 27, Issue 3 Pages 512-513
P Schwandt, WO Richter, and N Kriegisch

Abstract: Increasing interest in the regulation of lipolysis in adipose tissue results in large numbers of samples. On the other hand, the perifusion of isolated fat cells, with removal of fatty acids and other lipolysis-inhibiting substances with continuous measurements of free glycerol, is a model nearer to physiological conditions and allows observations concerning the time course of lipolysis. Here we report a system that is suitable for both applications, concurrently.
Glycerol Clinical analysis